dicyclohexylamine

dicyclohexylamine

[dī¦sī·klō‚hek′sil·ə‚mēn]
(organic chemistry)
(C6H11)2NH A clear, colorless liquid with a boiling point of 256°C; used for insecticides, corrosion inhibitors, antioxidants, and detergents, and as a plasticizer and catalyst.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyclamate metabolizes into two main byproducts cyclohexylamine and dicyclohexylamine. These are considered very toxic.
N, N-dicyclohexylbenzylamine was prepared starting from toluene and N-bromosuccinimide in CCl4 using benzoylperoxide as catalyst followed by the addition of dicyclohexylamine under reflux.
Dicyclohexylamine (25.0 mL, 0.5 mole) was added to the reaction mixture through condenser with the help of separating funnel drop wise.
From the synthesized compounds, 5a, 5b, and 5c substituted with morpholine, piperidine, and dicyclohexylamine, respectively, have emerged out as more potent antimicrobial agents than cinchophen and both of the standard drugs.
This excursion into N-nitrosamine legislation makes clear that DCBS is based on the "safe amine" dicyclohexylamine. This amine, as explained, is explicitly unrestricted in Germany and there is no limitation either for dicyclohexylamine nor DCBS.
German legislation has explicitly excluded dicyclohexylamines from any restrictions.