Dicynodontia

(redirected from dicynodont)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Dicynodontia

 

a suborder (or superfamily) of fossilized beastlike reptiles. They were widespread at the end of the Permian and the beginning of the Triassic periods. Their size ranged from that of a rat to that of a rhinoceros. The skull was massive, the teeth atrophied except for two tusks or fangs; the jaws had the form of a beak, as in turtles. Probably they were herbivorous. Remains of Dicynodontia have been found on all continents except Australia; they are especially numerous in Upper Permian deposits of South Africa.

REFERENCE

Osnovy paleontologii: Zemnovodnye, presmykaiushchiesia i ptitsy. Moscow, 1964.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The discovery of Lisowicia changes our ideas about the latest history of dicynodonts, mammal Triassic relatives.
"Dicynodonts were amazingly successful animals in the Middle and Late Triassic.
The discovery of Lisowicia provides the first evidence that mammal-like elephant sized dicynodonts were present at the same time as the more well-known long-necked sauropodomorph dinosaurs, contrary to previous belief.
Kammerer said that while dicynodonts and dinosaurs existed at the same time, there's no evidence yet that they lived in the same habitats.
Among dicynodonts, longitudinal nasofrontal ridges are known in several genera (Lystrosaurus, Van Hoepen 1913; Cluver 1971; Pristerodon, Barry 1967; Kingoria, Kemp 1969).
Dicynodonts are the first group of therapsids to develop a secondary palate.
The nasal cavity of gorgonopsians is much larger than in dicynodonts, but like pelycosaurs and other primitive therapsids, they lack a bony secondary palate.
The pattern of nasal turbinal ridges in therapsids indicates that the ventilation rates of the more primitive groups (dinocephalians, dicynodonts, and gorgonopsians) probably had not yet increased significantly beyond ancestral rates.
But dicynodonts were thought to have died out before the late Triassic period, by which time dinosaurs had become the dominant land creature.
Analysis of limb bones discovered in the Polish village of Lisowice shows the creature -- named Lisowicia bojani -- lived around 210-205 million years ago -- around 10 million years later than previous findings of dicynodonts.
"Dicynodonts were amazingly successful animals in the Middle and Late Triassic," said Grzegorz Niedzwiedzki from Sweden's Uppsala University.