dieback


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dieback

[′dī‚bak]
(ecology)
A large area of exposed, unprotected swamp or marsh deposits resulting from the salinity of a coastal lagoon.
(plant pathology)
Of a plant, to die from the top or peripheral parts.

dieback

A condition often found in woody plant material where browning and death of the plant cells begin from the tip inward and may continue as far as the woody or perennial part of the plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
As far as native forests in Australia are concerned, dieback in jarrah forests in Western Australia first became of serious concern after the Second World War when the cause was still unknown.
As the first units to be installed in Perth, this is an important step in terms of enhancing community awareness about dieback and how people can help protect our remaining precious urban tracts of bushland.
In a 2009 study by Urbez-Torres and others,6 Botryosphaeriaceae fungi were the most common fungi isolated from grapevines affected with dieback in Texas.
The ban follows a recommendation by the independent tree health and plant biosecurity expert taskforce, set up by the Government after Chalara ash dieback was discovered in the UK, to address current and possible tree health threats.
Last month, the Cabinet's crisis-response team convened to address ash dieback and mobilised hundreds of government employees to scope out the extent of the problem.
Ash dieback is nothing to do with nature, he explains.
The association is working closely with the Forestry Commission to compile a spotter's guide to help woodland owners identify the symptoms of ash dieback.
Dr Duke, a mangrove specialist, took a research team to Mackay in 2002 to begin investigating the unusual dieback.
They share this characteristic with the rock roses (Cistus species), much loved for their fragrant leaves and crepe-textured flowers in rose, salmon, purple and white, but short-lived and victimized by the same stem dieback to which cassias, acacias and other leguminous shrubs and trees succumb.
The Woodland Trust is using data which maps 280 million trees across England and Wales to assess the potential impact of tree diseases such as chalara ash dieback, which threatens to wipe out many ash trees, on the wider countryside.
IF you can't bear the thought of parting with your car and still want to help save the planet then plant a tree - but it can't be ash because of the restrictions imposed on account of ash dieback disease.
The Ministers were speaking at the All-Ireland Chalara ash dieback Conference in Dundalk, where they informed delegates that findings of the disease throughout the island of Ireland have been limited mainly to recently imported material.