dielectric


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dielectric

(dī'ĭlĕk`trĭk), material that does not conduct electricity readily, i.e., an insulator (see insulationinsulation
, use of materials or devices to inhibit or prevent the conduction of heat or of electricity. Common heat insulators are, fur, feathers, fiberglass, cellulose fibers, stone, wood, and wool; all are poor conductors of heat.
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). A good dielectric should also have other properties: It must resist breakdown under high voltages; it should not itself draw appreciable power from the circuit; it must have reasonable physical stability; and none of its characteristics should vary much over a fairly wide temperature range. One important application of dielectrics is as the material separating the plates of a capacitorcapacitor
or condenser,
device for the storage of electric charge. Simple capacitors consist of two plates made of an electrically conducting material (e.g., a metal) and separated by a nonconducting material or dielectric (e.g.
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. A capacitor with plates of a given area will vary in its ability to store electric charge depending on the material separating the plates. On the basis of this variation each insulating material can be assigned a dielectric constant. Generally, the dielectric constant of air is defined as 1 and other dielectric constants are determined with reference to it. Other properties of interest in a dielectric are dielectric strength, a measure of the maximum voltage it can sustain without significant conduction, and the degree to which it is free from power losses.
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dielectric

[‚dī·ə′lek·trik]
(materials)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dielectric

1. a substance or medium that can sustain a static electric field within it
2. a substance or body of very low electrical conductivity; insulator
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dielectric

An insulator (glass, rubber, plastic, etc.). Dielectric materials can be made to hold an electrostatic charge, but current cannot flow through them.
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, not many reviews have described the potential application of chemical synthesis that uses enzymes as catalyst, especially in relation to the microwave processing aspects and their dielectric properties.
The gate dielectric effects and gate bias dependence of TID effects on Si VDMOS have been evaluated.
Some researchers have reported a study of the dielectric properties of blood as a function of temperature.
Robustly proliferating electrical and electronic industry in Asia Pacific is slated to fare well for the growth of plastic dielectric films market.
This is reportedly driving consumption of dielectric gases at a global level, as a majority of application areas continue to opt for dielectric gases as a preferred insulating medium over others.
Since we used similar dielectrics on both signal layers in our example, we shouldn't expect the dielectric loss component to be much different between the narrow trace on layer 3 and the wider trace on layer 6.
"We then highlighted how Dielectric is designing, building, and shipping a record number of antenna systems to serve the historic, national spectrum repack initiative."
Mathematical model of surface charge accumulation at the flat interface between two dielectrics. A high-voltage thermosetting composite insulation of electrical machine can be represented in the form of two layers of dielectric: a glass fiber substrate (1) with an impregnating compound (3) and a mica paper tape (2) as a dielectric barrier (Fig.
The dielectric properties of such composites are, however, very dependent on temperature, and the dissipation factor is high.
In this work, the relationship between the structure and the dielectric properties of the azo polymers was studied.
To describe the dielectric behaviors of a heterogeneous system caused by the Maxwell-Wagner polarization, various models have been developed (e.g., [11-20]) and a comprehensive review of the models can be found in Cai et al.
In July 2015, she filed a third-party action for negligence and respondeat superior against Dielectrics and Ramos.