dielectric loss factor

dielectric loss factor

[‚dī·ə¦lek·trik ¦los ‚fak·tər]
(electricity)
Product of the dielectric constant of a material and the tangent of its dielectric loss angle.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dielectric loss factor in the polymer has been calculated by the Iu"=Df.Iu' formula.
[14] show that the dielectric constant of the novel conjugated polycyanurate thin films decreased with increasing frequency, while in contrast, the dielectric loss factor increased with the increasing frequency.
The dielectric loss factor ([epsilon]") of the copolymers decreased as the frequency increased [22, 24] (Figure 14).
To obtain the dielectric properties, the capacity (C) and the dielectric dissipation factor (tan S) of a specimen were measured simultaneously while heating the specimen at a rate of 1[degrees]C per minute from -30[degrees]C to 150[degrees]C, and the relative permittivity ([[epsilon]'.sub.r]) and relative dielectric loss factor ([[epsilon]".sub.r]), the real part and the imaginary part of complex relative permittivity ([[epsilon].sub.r.sup.*]), respectively, were obtained.
The AC conductivity was calculated with the Novocontrol Win DETA software by using the measured values of dielectric permittivity and the dielectric loss factor.
where [epsilon]" is dielectric loss factor, f is microwave frequency of 2450 MHz, [[epsilon].sub.0] is vacuum dielectric constant, and E is electric field intensity, V/m.
The electromagnetic wave behaviour depends essentially on the dielectric properties (the dielectric constant and the dielectric loss factor).
Tire dust has a low dielectric loss factor and a high dielectric constant, which explains the fact that its attenuation per unit length is smaller than that of the rice husks.
The dielectric loss factor is a measure of a material's ability to convert electrical energy to heat.
The dielectric properties of dielectric constant ([epsilon]') and dielectric loss factor ([epsilon]'') can be derived from transmission line theory, which can determine the strength of reflected/transmitted microwave signals from a sample material [28].
Dielectric properties like dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor are critical parameters in designing the RF heating protocol.