dielectrophoresis


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dielectrophoresis

[¦dī·ə‚lek·trō·fə′rē·səs]
(physical chemistry)
The ability of an uncharged material to move when subjected to an electric field.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stoddart et al., "Active control of silver nanoparticles spacing using dielectrophoresis for surface-enhanced Raman scattering," Analytical Chemistry, vol.
Flandre, "Resonant dielectrophoresis and electrohydrodynamics for high-sensitivity impedance detection of whole-cell bacteria," Lab on a Chip, vol.
[5] Nonstandard abbreviations: CTC, circulating tumor cell; EpCAM, epithelial cell adhesion molecule; EMT, epithelial-mesenchymal transition; DEP, dielectrophoresis.
Wang et al., "Continuous-flow sorting of stem cells and differentiation products based on dielectrophoresis," Lab on a Chip, vol.
6,686,842) can detect a human or other living subject from as far as 500 meters away via the product's "polarization unit" using an "electrokinetic effect" and "dielectrophoresis": "The operator scans the locator device in a constant speed uniform linear motion back and forth.
Among active single-cell trapping schemes, dielectrophoresis is the most commonly used method, which confines cells via their inducible electric dipoles in an electric field gradient, featured with selective cellular capture and release [14-16].
Ahn, "The synthesis of ZnO nanowires and their subsequent use in high-current field-effect transistors formed by dielectrophoresis alignment," Physica E, vol.
The researchers collected blood samples from 167 participants in the trial and isolated CTCs using dielectrophoresis field-flow fractionation.
For the experimental characterization of individual cells, non-invasive AC electrokinetic techniques such as electrorotation (ER), dielectrophoresis (DEP) and electroorientation (EO) are used, whereas for biological cell suspensions the dielectric spectroscopy (DS) technique is generally applied [3-6].
The emphasis is on simulating direct-current electrokinetic phenomena such as electroosmosis, electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis, and induced-charge electrokinetics; these phenomena have been widely used to manipulate fluids and particles in microfluidic and nanofluidic devices for various applications.