dietary fiber


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Related to dietary fiber: Soluble fiber

dietary fiber

[¦dī·ə‚ter·ē ′fī·bər]
(food engineering)
The plant-cell-wall polysaccharides and lignin in a food or food ingredient that are not broken down by the digestive enzymes of animals and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dietary fiber is defined as "edible part of plants or analogous to carbohydrates that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the small intestine, with complete or partial fermentation in the large intestine.
Low socioeconomic status and low educational level are correlated with unhealthy eating habits such as low intake of dietary fiber [10].
After the completion of the above process, content of dietary fiber was calculated as follows:
There was a significant trend for lower risk of both symptomatic OA (P less than .002) and pain worsening (P = .005) across four quartiles of daily total dietary fiber intake (mean of 9.1 g, 13 g, 16 g, and 21.9 g in quartiles 1-4).
The influence of dietary fiber on nutrient utilization (Ravindran et al., 1984; Wilfart et al., 2007) and endogenous nitrogen excretion (Schulze et al., 1994; Yin et al., 2000) has been documented.
The positive attributes of dietary fiber propels their use as specialty ingredients in end-use industries such as food and pharmaceuticals.
(2007), however, indicate a negative effect of dietary cellulose levels on lipid digestibility in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).The study of the effects of dietary fibers on nutrients metabolism is complicated by the fact that the dietary fiber is not a homogeneous compound but consists of a variety of substances, including cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, mucilage, gums, algal polysaccharides and lignin.
Contributions at the Carbohydrate Division Symposium at the Institute of Food Technologists' 2009 annual meeting in Anaheim, California are combined with invited chapters by specialists working with resistant starch, a class of dietary fiber. The topics include starch biosynthesis in relation to resistant starch, slowly digestible starch and health benefits, measuring resistant starch and incorporating resistant starch into dietary fiber measurements, the role of carbohydrates in preventing type 2 diabetes, and a host of unanswered questions regarding the microbiology of resistant starch fermentation in the human large intestine.
Wheat and oat brans are considered conventional sources of dietary fiber and, therefore, are marketed on a large scale, contributing to the healthy diet of a significant portion of the population.
One serving of foods such as whole-wheat pasta and two servings of fruits and vegetables are equivalent to about seven grams of dietary fiber. Researchers noted that greater fiber intake can help offset stroke risks such as obesity, smoking and having hypertension.
Chocola BB Sparkling + Fiber is a new carbonated supplement drink that contains 2.4 g of dietary fiber (equivalent to 1.6 celery stalks) in addition to collagen, niacin, vitamin B6, and 1,000 mg of vitamin C.
[1.] Prakongpan T, Nitihamyong A and P Luangpituksa Extraction and application of dietary fiber and cellulose from pineapple cores.