difference

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difference

1. Maths
a. the result of the subtraction of one number, quantity, etc., from another
b. the single number that when added to the subtrahend gives the minuend; remainder
2. Logic another name for differentia
3. Maths of two sets
a. the set of members of the first that are not members of the second.
b. symmetric difference the set of members of one but not both of the given sets.

difference

contrast, unlikeness. Three interrelated but distinct usages of the term are important:
  1. (within SAUSSURE's linguistic theory) the presupposed (or ‘absent’) contrast(s) in any signification, necessary because meaning is never present in individual signifiers but gained (and never fully or finally) by contrast with other signifiers;
  2. (for DERRIDA) an emphasis above all, on the open-endedness of différence and djfférance, as undermining ‘several kingdoms’, including the ‘metaphysics of presence’ and the ‘logocentrism’ of traditional philosophy (as well as some of Saussure's interpretations of his own linguistics). See also DECONSTRUCTION.
  3. (more general use of the term) cultural differences of any kind.

Compare OTHERNESS.

Difference

 

a comparative description of objects, based on the fact that properties present in some objects are lacking in others. In materialist dialectics, “difference” is understood as a necessary moment in every thing, phenomenon, and process, characterizing its inner contradictoriness and development.

The category of difference is inseparable from the category of identity. The closest connection and mutual interpenetration of difference and identity occurs in the course of the reflection of the movement and development of objects, when difference exists within identity, and identity within difference. The objective basis for the unity of difference and identity is the unity between the stability and the changeability of things. In this unity, stability is manifested as the identity of the changing object with itself, and changeability, as a violation of this identity, or as difference within identity.

difference

[′dif·rəns]
(mathematics)
The result of subtracting one number from another.
The difference between two sets A and B is the set consisting of all elements of A which do not belong to B; denoted A-B.
References in classic literature ?
In the next place, wonderful as it seems in a sexual world, the Martians were absolutely without sex, and therefore without any of the tumultuous emotions that arise from that difference among men.
Such are Dithyrambic and Nomic poetry, and also Tragedy and Comedy; but between them the difference is, that in the first two cases these means are all employed in combination, in the latter, now one means is employed, now another.
The only difference consists in the opposite character of the equality advocated by these two men; one is the equality that elevates, the other is the equality that degrades; one brings a king within reach of the guillotine, the other elevates the people to a level with the throne.
And whereas all subjects cannot be armed, yet when those whom you do arm are benefited, the others can be handled more freely, and this difference in their treatment, which they quite understand, makes the former your dependents, and the latter, considering it to be necessary that those who have the most danger and service should have the most reward, excuse you.
I make my own bread, and there's no difference between one batch and another from year's end to year's end; but if I'd got any other woman besides Vixen in the house, I must pray to the Lord every baking to give me patience if the bread turned out heavy.
With them there hardly appeared to be any difference of opinion upon any subject whatever.
Moreover, on the view of the origin of genera which I shall presently give, we have no right to expect often to meet with generic differences in our domesticated productions.
because we never meant when we constructed the State, that the opposition of natures should extend to every difference, but only to those differences which affected the pursuit in which the individual is engaged; we should have argued, for example, that a physician and one who is in mind a physician may be said to have the same nature.
In order to prove conclusively that mnemic phenomena arise whenever certain physiological conditions are fulfilled, we ought to be able actually to see differences between the brain of a man who speaks English and that of a man who speaks French, between the brain of a man who has seen New York and can recall it, and that of a man who has never seen that city.
It was not in his calmness that she read his comparative difference.
It was contrary to every doctrine of her's that difference of fortune should keep any couple asunder who were attracted by resemblance of disposition; and that Elinor's merit should not be acknowledged by every one who knew her, was to her comprehension impossible.
In some of the States the difference is very material.