diffraction loss

diffraction loss

[di′frak·shən ‚lȯs]
(physics)
That part of the reduction in power of a propagating wave or beam that results from diffraction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To improve the prediction accuracy of diffraction loss, the proposed method uses ignored edges in the Bullington method to calculate additive diffraction losses.
Our proposed model is a deterministic model, a terrain model which computes path loss based on the diffraction loss of multiple knife-edge obstructions using the Epstein-Peterson path geometry method [19], Fresnel-Kirchhoff's theory, and FSL.
Lmsd gives diffraction loss as a result of multiple obstacles.
Chong, "Research and simulation of signal diffraction loss based on UTD theory", in 5th Int.
It is noted that larger knife-edge diffraction loss [L.sub.kf] can be introduced by a higher value of v which is proportional to the effective height h of an obstruction ship.
Propagation through loss with the added diffraction loss is shown in Figs.
Moreover, some physical insights have been discussed on the origin of the diffraction loss in the TIR facets.
Knife-edge diffraction loss is then determined from the homograph in Figure 4.
For the radiation present at a given wavelength [lambda] the diffraction loss can be described in terms of a unit-less parameter, v = 2[pi][PSI]R/[lambda].
But unlike the case of open-sea, the influence of the obstacles near the inland river (e.g., diffraction loss caused by some large bridges) and mixed-path effect cannot be neglected.
When radio-wave transmitting under urban microcell, diffraction loss is so much more than reflection loss generally that it is quite necessary to distinguish reflection and diffraction using the type weight of the ray.