diffusion theory

diffusion theory

[də′fyü·zhən ‚thē·ə·rē]
(electricity)
The theory that in semiconductors, where there is a variation of carrier concentration, a motion of the carriers is produced by diffusion in addition to the drift determined by the mobility and the electric field.
References in periodicals archive ?
Existing theories, however, predict a huge inner gas pressure (typically around 30 atm) and, consequently, molecular diffusion theory would predict that they would dissolve extremely quickly - on a timescale of about 1 microsecond.
Livestock vaccine adoption among poor farmers in Bolivia: Remembering innovation diffusion theory. Vaccine, 26, 2433-2442.
(1991), the Innovation Diffusion Theory by Rogers (1995), the Social Cognitive Theory by Bandura (1986) and the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) by Venkatesh et al.
Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT) proposed by Rogers (2010) has been widely applied for studying the adoption and diffusion of innovation as it is widely accepted to offer a reliable framework for examining the adoption and diffusion of a new technology.
Ruland bases his analysis on the diffusion theory developed by Amitav Acharya about "constitutive localisation" which gives agency to local actors instead of simply treating them as "hapless norm recipients", giving attention to the "cognitive prior" or preexisting cultures, norms and practices that continue to influence how various stakeholders respond to new modernizing ideas coming from outside.
The current study is concerned with filling this research gap and investigates the state-level diffusion process of PFP using policy diffusion theory. Previous studies employing theories of diffusion have examined other topics including energy policy (Freeman, 1985), licensing laws (Lute, 1986), state lotteries (Berry and Berry, 1990), affirmative action policies (Kellough, Selden and Legge, 1997), and education reforms (Mintrom and Vergari, 1998).
Rogers (1995) describes diffusion theory as a process whereby innovation is communicated, and adopted, through specified channels over time among members of a social system.
Therefore, in this paper, the diffusion theory of the ISF in porous media with fracture channels is derived.
The diffusion theory has been more widely applied in recent decades since it explains many observations in laboratory and field settings [9-11].
That's probably because their fabric performed better than the theoretical maximum: according to the report from LLNL, their new fabric could "sustain gas-transport rates exceeding that of a well-known diffusion theory by more than one order of magnitude."
The second chapter combines the Technology Acceptance Model with the Innovation Diffusion Theory to identify the antecedents for widespread adoption of the Octopus retail e-payment system in Hong Kong.
Diffusion theory assumes that innovations are invariably positive.

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