diglycine

diglycine

[dī′glī‚sēn]
(organic chemistry)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Similar results have been obtained in (NaCl + water + Glucose) [17], (NaI + water + glucose) [18], (NaBr + water + glucose) [19], (diglycine + water + fructose) [20], and (1-histidine + water + glucose) [21] systems.
Hopkinson, "A comparison of copper(I) and silver(I) complexes of glycine, diglycine and triglycine," Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, vol.
Trypsinization of an ubiquitinated protein yields a diglycine signature as a remnant at the position where ubiquitin was bound and results in a mass increase of 114.0429 Da on ggSP.
Structurally, ubiquitin is an 8.5 kDa, 76 amino acid polypeptide that forms a compact structure with an exposed carboxy terminal tail containing a diglycine motif that can be covalently ligated via an isopeptide bond to the primary e-amino group of lysine (Lys) residues on a target substrate.
Antioxidant activity of maillard reaction products derived from aqueous glucose/glycine, diglycine, and triglycine model systems as a function.
Glycine and diglycine as possible catalytic factors in the prebiotic evolution of peptides.
The most successful immunization strategy used an immunogen consisting of a CCK-12 analog corresponding to 0-sulfated CCK-10 extended at the N-terminus with a diglycine bridge for carrier coupling.
Aromatic aldehyde (salicyaldehyde and benzaldehyde) undergo condensation reaction with peptides (diglycine and triglycine, result in the formation of Schiff base ligands which give colored complexes with Cu, Pd and Pt metal ions.