dilator

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dilator

[dī′lād·ər]
(physiology)
Any muscle, instrument, or drug causing dilation of an organ or part.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Miosis is a decrease in pupil size as a result of paralysis of the iris dilator muscles. The sphincter and dilator muscles of the pupil are innervated, respectively, by the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems.
Epidemiological studies suggested that OSA is another common sleep-related disorder in PD.[6],[7] Previous studies reported the frequency of OSA in PD patients between 20% and 66%.[8] Upper airway obstruction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of OSA.[9] Reduced upper airway dilator muscle activity at sleep results in an obstructive respiratory event.
Scientists believe that impaired activation of the pharyngeal dilator muscles decreases their tone to the point that structures supported by these muscles are easily drawn into the airway during sleep in OSA sufferers.
Fregosi, "Influence of posture and breathing route on neural drive to upper airway dilator muscles during exercise," Journal of Applied Physiology, vol.
In addition to the typical muscular coat of the foregut, the pharynx has dilator muscles that aid in conveying food from the buccal cavity to the esophagus (Chapman 1985; Skaer 1993).
The intrinsic muscles are formed of a pair of dilator muscles and a pair of constrictor muscles.
Upper airway collapsibility may reflect the impaired function of upper airway dilator muscles such as the genioglossus muscle.