dilator

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dilator

[dī′lād·ər]
(physiology)
Any muscle, instrument, or drug causing dilation of an organ or part.
References in periodicals archive ?
2] In our case, cervical dilatation was performed with Hegar dilators and the patient did not immediately require repeated dilatation.
The dilation of the nasal lateral walls, specifically in the region of the nasal valve can happen through medication or the use of devices, such as the internal or external nasal dilators (7).
These patients meeting the inclusion criteria were divided into two groups: the group of balloon dilators (group A) and the group of fascial dilators (group B).
Lojanapiwat reported that gradual dilation technique with Amplatz dilators can be comfortably used in patients with a history of open-stone surgery.
Amplatz dilators with the central guide rod are removed after confirming that sheath is in the collecting system.
With the guidance of a physical therapist, women can learn about home use of a series of graduated vaginal dilators.
1-4) In addition, Masters and Johnson advocated the use of dilators for patients with female sexual dysfunction in order to interrupt the cycle of pain-fear-muscle spasm-more pain, and to build confidence "in the privacy of the marital bedroom.
This required synchronised sequential insertion of dilators guided by tactile sensation of depth and multiple fluoroscopic exposures.
Medical-grade Silent Snooz Dilators are designed to ease--if not eliminate--both the immediate and the peripheral discomfort for those affected by snoring and snorers.
The young woman died of toxic shock after seaweed dilators were inserted to expand her cervix in preparation for a second trimester abortion.
Dilating involves inserting dildos or dilators (which progress gradually in size as the vaginismus decreases) into the vagina.
are soft, resilient, comfortable, and easy-to-use nasal dilators used to relieve breathing restriction caused by chronic congestion, nasal valve collapse, septal deviation, or medium hypertrophy.