diminution

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diminution

Music the presentation of the subject of a fugue, etc., in which the note values are reduced in length

Diminution

The decrease in size of a column toward the top; typically employed as a device to overcome or correct an optical appearance of the top being larger than the bottom.

diminution

[‚dim·ə′nü·shən]
(botany)
Increasing simplification of inflorescences on successive branches.
(computer science)
Limiting the negative effect of an attack on a computer system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using translations in diminutive research has a long history (cf.
The first is to provide a semantic classification of diminutive verbs in Croatian within a cognitive linguistics framework which will take into account a) the polysemous structures formed by the diminutive verbs with respect to the underlying conceptualization patterns, b) their interaction with the traditionally grammatical notions of perfectivity, pluractionality and iterativity.
In Robert Burns's poetry, which since Late Modern times has grown to epitomize Scots verse, instances of diminutive forms as endearing ones occur, most notably, in his 1785 poem 'To a Mouse', which opens with the following lines:
Examination of the people in the dual-focus group found 710 polyps, including 530 diminutive lesions; the control group had 599 polyps, including 445 that were 5 mm or less.
Major Finding: High-definition, dual-focus colonoscopy produced 75% accurate, high-confidence diagnoses of diminutive polyps, vs.
In 1986 the rivalry was almost forgotten - until diminutive soccer genius Diego Maradona scored with his notorious `Hand of God' goal, as well as a superb individual effort which knocked England out of the championship.
Spanish diminutive formation is analyzed in terms of analogy, more precisely within the computationally explicit framework of analogical modeling of language (AML; Skousen 1989, 1992).
Soon even local traders in the middle of the desert were muttering about the unfortunate demise of the diminutive entertainer - just goes to show how dangerous loose talk can be.
But diminutive lest conveys the exact opposite of what the writer wants to say: The conjunction is defined thus in American Heritage Dictionary, 4th Edition: "For fear that: tiptoed lest the guard should hear her; anxious lest he become ill." Substitute hoping she'd return, or in hopes that she'd fly back, for lest she fly back home.
One of the etymological mysteries of contemporary English historical linguistics is the origin of the diminutive suffix -y, -ie, which first appeared during the Middle English Period.
The diminutive sports star strung Keegan up by his tie - but it was only a bit of horseplay.
THE diminutive Renault Clio 172 sportscar wowed judges with its acceleration and safety performance at this year's Autocar magazine showdown.