dinitrophenol


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dinitrophenol

[dī¦nī·trō′fē‚nȯl]
(organic chemistry)
Any one of six isomeric substituent products of benzene having the empirical formula (NO2)2C6H3OH.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among these, two methods are arsenic based: one is based on a formulation of copper, chrome and arsenic (CCA) substances; the other is based on formulations of dinitrophenol, fluoride, and arsenic (DFA) substances.
Such treatment with dinitrophenol results in "loose-coupling" of oxidative phosphorylation, oxidation of NADH, and diminished ATP formation (Blackstone and Buss, 1992, 1993).
She had taken a Dinitrophenol because she had been to an allyou-can-eat buffet and was scared of gaining weight.
A study of 567 agricultural workers in France that evaluated exposure to any pesticide, three pesticide classes, or 13 herbicide families, using no exposure to the pesticide class/family in question as the reference, reported positive associations between depression and exposure to herbicides in general and dinitrophenol herbicides, but not exposure to any pesticide, fungicides, insecticides, or the other 12 herbicide families (Weisskopf et al.
Eloise, 21, drove herself to hospital after taking the tablets containing highly-toxic Dinitrophenol or DNP.
Fiona Parry was speaking after yesterday's inquest into her troubled 21-year-old daughter's death, which was caused by an accidental overdose of unlicensed 'slimming tablets' containing the toxic substance Dinitrophenol (DNP).
An inquest held in Shrewsbury heard Miss Parry, who had a history of bulimia, died after taking eight unlicensed tablets containing dinitrophenol (DNP) which she bought online.
Known as DNP, or 2,4, Dinitrophenol is used as a pesticide and can cause rapid weight loss.
Bush and Rechnitz [4] used an electrochemical transducer with a membrane-encapsulated antibody indicator system to quantitate dinitrophenol.
Additionally, the cardiovascular defects caused by benzene, toluene, and their mixtures are similar to those caused by hexachlorobenzene, dinitrophenol, parathion, carbaryl, tolbutamide, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid[3,4,6,7,8,9,10,11].
The 21-year-old, who was obsessed with losing weight and had battled for years with an eating disorder, took a lethal dose of unlicensed slimming tablets containing Dinitrophenol (DNP) - a substance normally used in explosives, pesticides and dyes.