diode switch

diode switch

[′dī‚ōd ‚swich]
(electronics)
Diode which is made to act as a switch by the successive application of positive and negative biasing voltages to the anode (relative to the cathode), thereby allowing or preventing, respectively, the passage of other applied waveforms within certain limits of voltage.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, the PIN diode switch is an optimum choice because it has low insertion loss, fast response, low control voltage, and reliable.
The single capacitive feed antenna has a three pin diode switch enabling operation in three sets of frequency bands: 700-750 MHz (LTE Low), DCS, PCS, UMTS, Wi-Fi, WiMAX and LTE at 2.7 GHz; 750-800 MHz (LTE High), DCS, PCS, UMTS, Wi-Fi, WiMAX and LTE at 2.7 GHz; and GSM850, GSM900, DCS, PCS, UMTS, Wi-Fi, WiMAX and LTE at 2.7 GHz.
All of these waveguide PIN- diode switch models require a dual voltage bias of [+ or -]5 VDC and have a maximum-rated CW input power level of 0.5 dBm.
Due to non linearity of the pin diode switch it is important to measure the amount of signal distortion of switchable band-stop to all pass filters using the measurement setup shown in Figure 10.
[12.] Kim, D.-W., "Small-sized high-power PIN diode switch with defected ground structure for wireless broadband internet," ETRI Journal, Vol.
The model MSN-5DT-05-STD is an SP5T, PIN diode switch with options 1422, 12X and LVT that operates from 14 to 22 GHz.
The PIN diode switch is very popular in microwave circuit applications due to its fast switching speeds, reasonably high current handling capabilities, reliability and ease of modelling.
The performance advantages of multi-gate pHEMTs compared to PIN diode switch components include lower insertion loss, lower power consumption (since diode switch components require continuous applied bias for switching operation) and reduced size (as a MMIC pHEMT replaces multiple PIN diode devices in multiband switches).
This is due to the fact that the actual PIN diode switch is very different from the ideal switch that assumed in the previous section.
When looking for a coaxial microwave switch that can handle moderate power levels, the options considered are likely to be a PIN diode switch or an electromechanical switch.
For example, Keysight's Model 85331B PIN diode switch handles signals with frequencies from 45 MHz to 50 GHz, but the maximum insertion loss increases from 2 dB at 500 MHz to 15.5 dB at 50 GHz.
Figure 8 shows the comparison results of the simulated and measured radiation patterns for each PIN diode switch configuration.