diphenyl ether

diphenyl ether

[dī¦fen·əl ′e‚thər]
(organic chemistry)
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This is the first known incidence of PBDE (or polybrominated diphenyl ether) contamination of U.S.
WASHINGTON--Later this year, the US Environmental Protection Agency (epa.gov) says it will begin the process to convince users to voluntarily phase out the polybrominated diphenyl ether chemical known as decaBDE.
The improved range includes 17 new compounds that are all halogen-free, chlorine-free, and antimony-free and compliant with the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RollS) directives; offering flame retardancy without the use of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE).
Its goal is to dramatically reduce the use of lead, cadmium mercury, hexavalent chromium and both polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) and polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retarcants in the production of new electrical and electronic equipment.
A scientific study of contamination levels of Polychlorinated Diphenyl Ether (PBDE) in farmed and wild salmon which was published this week showed that Scottish farmed salmon had the second highest level.
Polybrominated diphenyl ether levels in the blood of pregnant women living in an agricultural community in California.
Bergman, "Photochemical decomposition of 15 polybrominated diphenyl ether congeners in methanol/water," Environmental Science and Technology, vol.
Telcar TL-1934 compounds are said to provide excellent flame resistance while meeting RollS standards by containing no polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardant.
The range includes 17 new compounds which are all halogen, chlorine and antimony free, low smoke and are compliant with the Restriction of Hazardous Substances directives; offering flame retardancy without the use of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE).
Polychlorinated diphenyl ether concentrations increased by 58 percent.
The presence of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) has been detected in the organisms of Mediterranean swordfish off the coast of Italy.
By the end of 2004, reports Great Lakes Chemical Co., it will voluntarily cease production of two flame-retardant chemicals, penta-polybrominated diphenyl ether (penta) and octa-polybrominated diphenyl ether (octa).