Diphthong

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diphthong

A diphthong is a single-syllable vowel sound in which the beginning of the sound is different from the end sound—that is, the sound glides from one vowel sound to another. For this reason, diphthongs are often referred to as gliding vowels.
There are eight vowel sounds in American English that are generally agreed upon as being diphthongs.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Diphthong

 

the combination of two vowels—a syllabic and a nonsyllabic vowel—in one syllable, for example, the French [oi]. Two types of diphthongs may be distinguished: the rising diphthong, in which the second vowel is the syllable-building element, for example, the French [ie] and [ui] and the falling diphthong, in which the first vowel is the syllable-building element, for example, the English [ai] and [au].

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The process is discussed in some detail in Collins (1983a) and numerous examples of diphthongization and centralization of final high vowels can be found in Collins (1983b).
Of particular interest are the diphthongs that have been formed as a result of the diphthongization of long /a/ and /o/.
Andersen, Henning 1972 "Diphthongization", Language 48:11-50.
(19.) Note in parentheses that diphthongization may be viewed in a similar light.
nami, fuori (modern nahme, fuhre to nehmen "take," fahren "go, travel"; Braune and Eggers 1975: 54-55).--Note that diphthongization of *a > *au > *o by a following *w, in contrast to umlaut by *u, must have preceded the Rhythmic Law: cf.
Acoustically, the French vowel in comme and bonne matches the initial English vowel of go, and the French /[??]/of donner matches the initial English vowel of toe (before diphthongization).
Also, diphthongization in modern dialects has been leveled due to the widespread use of standard language.
In a similar vein, Eddington (1996a) found that the relationship between certain derivational suffixes and diphthongization in Spanish word stems is far from binary as previous investigation had considered it to be.
A phonological change finally is accomplished when the glide approximant is absorbed by the adjacent vowel, resulting often in a vowel lengthening or diphthongization, with loss of the phonetic retroflexion which had no basis to maintain itself independently as a syllable prosodic.
The long u is absent (in Q2 and Q3 words) because diphthongization into ui is a common feature of the North Estonian dialects.
None of the words with spellings modified to <i/y> managed to survive into Late Middle English, and none of them participated in the 15th century diphthongization [i:] > [ii], a part of the Great Vowel Shift.
In a similar vein, Eddington (1996a) finds that when a large number of instances is considered, the relationship between certain derivational suffixes and diphthongization in Spanish word stems is far from binary, as previous investigation had considered it to be.