diploid

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Related to diploid karyotype: Karyogram

diploid

Biology (of cells or organisms) having pairs of homologous chromosomes so that twice the haploid number is present
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Diploid

 

an organism whose cells have a double (diploid; 2n) set of chromosomes, representing a single (haploid; n) set of paired homologous chromosomes. For example, man has 23 pairs of chromosomes (n = 23’,2n = 46), and an onion has eight pairs of chromosomes (n = 8; 2n = 16). The transition from the diploid state (diplophase) to the haploid (haplo-phase) is accomplished by the first meiotic division, as a result of which the sex cells, or gametes, are formed. When the gametes fuse, the diploid number of chromosomes is restored.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

diploid

[′di‚plȯid]
(crystallography)
A crystal form in the isometric system having 24 similar quadrilateral faces arranged in pairs.
(genetics)
Having two complete chromosome pairs in a nucleus (2N).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To identify the optimal chromosome ratio for each chromosome of interest, we reviewed the unaffected subset of the training data (i.e., including only samples with diploid karyotypes for chromosomes 21,18,13, and X) and considered each autosome as a potential denominator in a ratio of counts with our chromosomes of interest.
In twin gestations with complete moles, the abnormal fetal vessels in the stem villi characteristic of PMD are absent even though the fetus may have a diploid karyotype. Complete hydatidiform moles may also exhibit high levels of IGF-II expression and loss of expression of [p57.sup.KIP2], but these are purely androgenetic and the entire genome is paternally derived.
Reference DNA was extracted in the same manner from tissues that had been demonstrated conclusively to have a normal female diploid karyotype. Direct labeling CGH was performed with test DNA labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate-12-deoxyuridine triphosphate (FITC-12-dUTP) and reference DNA labeled with Tetramethyl-Rhodamine-6-dUTP (TRITC-6-dUTP) as described previously.[3] Diploid metaphase spreads were obtained from peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures of normal diploid male donors using standard protocols to obtain chromosomes of band resolution 450-550 band length.