dipsomania

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dipsomania

a compulsive desire to drink alcoholic beverages
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Some say she was a dipsomaniac because she could not have her love, Dr.
All that Jack does in the story; in fact, is to die in an alcoholic stupor, leaving his red-cheeked, dipsomaniac sister Alice to be spurned by the glamorous Charles Adams--a figure modelled on Samuel Richardson's Sir Charles Grandison--and to take solace in drink herself: "She flew to her Bottle and it was soon forgot" (29).
Those unflattering portraits, which depicted the defender of decentralism as a prolix dipsomaniac who stood athwart the Constitutional Convention yelling "Stop
What most trainers end up with is a ragbag of undischarged bankrupts, dipsomaniac ex-publicans, hard-punting conspiracy theorists and 100-strong syndicates consisting of 100 self-taught racing managers.
Consuming lean meat and fish, lots of fruit and vegetables, wholemeal bread, almost no dairy products, and rather less alcohol, though I'm still a dipsomaniac according to the official Government guidelines).
258), and how Shaw's father was not the hopeless dipsomaniac of his son's reminiscences.
For his part, Bruno is a dipsomaniac, coveting casual sex, and an inveterate masturbator; he loses his teaching job after sexually assaulting a student in class.
In her last outing, Grace was saddled with a psychotic bulldog, in her new adventure, it is a dipsomaniac parrot called Tallulah.
22) They were left in the possession of George Cooper, a dipsomaniac friend of Foster's who was also a songwriter, when Foster died; subsequently they were in the possession of a niece of Cooper's who lived in Philadelphia, and whose books and papers I bought at storage sale auction.
A major downfall is with the performance of Carol Harrison, who plays the slightly dipsomaniac Lynne," wrote the critic.
And he enjoyed being out here for the very simple reason that his wife was a dipsomaniac.
This is the constraining cosmos such as we find in Dante's Commedia, in the bleak, postlapsarian books of Milton's Paradise Lost and post-Restoration prose tracts, in the twisted consciousness of Dostoevsky's underground man, in the fatal Ferris wheel of events that ensnare Lowry's doomed, dipsomaniac consul, and, of course, in Haftling 174517's Auschwitz (Levi 8).