directional beam

directional beam

[də′rek·shən·əl ′bēm]
(electromagnetism)
A radio or radar wave that is concentrated in a given direction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lens is placed such that it produces a highly directional beam of light.
The need for a narrow directional beam to focus transmission power can further complicate efforts to achieve wide area coverage under non-line-of-sight conditions.
Santilli, Corporate Chief Scientist, states: "Following decades of mathematical, theoretical and experimental work as well as large private investment, we have achieved an operational equipment producing on demand a directional beam of neutrons synthesized from the hydrogen gas in the desired flux and energy (http://thunder-energies.com/docs/dns1-info.pdf).
They use directional beam arrays focused within a 15A spread, with more power directed to the devices and less exposure to interference from other networks.
After collimation, a directional beam splitter (DBS) as described in Subsection 2.3 directs the laser light to the microscope.
HyperSound delivers high fidelity audio in a directional beam using thin sound emitters.
Even though it shows a remarkable peak gain in front directional beam patterns, it is rather cumbersome and, moreover, does not allow an omnidirectional pattern.
The LRAD can emit a highly directional beam of sound at a pain-inducing 150 decibels.
Researchers from the Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE) in Singapore, and Imperial College London in the UK made T-rays into a much stronger directional beam than was thought possible, and have clone so at room-temperature conditions.
The identification lobe of the reader is a directional beam, offering precise determination of the detection area and solving multilane, entry, and exit reader challenges encountered in parking lots and secured areas.

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