disability glare

disability glare

[dis·ə′bil·əd·ē ‚glār]
(communications)

disability glare

Reduces the ability to perceive the visual information needed for a particular activity. See also: Glare

disability glare

Glare that reduces visual performance and visibility and often is accompanied by discomfort.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There are two types of glare: discomfort glare (annoying or painful sensation) and disability glare (impaired or reduced visibility).
Subjects were evaluated at baseline, three months and six months for MPOD (Macular Pigment Optical Density) and markers of visual performance including contrast sensitivity, photostress recovery, and disability glare.
* Disability glare threshold (the point at which subjects could no longer see a target through a glaring ring of light) (13)
This means that high blue content can trigger intense disability glare, in which stray light reduces our eyes' ability to resolve spatial detail.
And as cars soon become equipped with LED or laser headlights, the oncoming disability glare while night-driving will get even worse.
Disability glare is the effect associated with reductions in visual performance, but not necessarily coupled with discomfort sensations.
Disability glare. An index of disability glare was measured using the Berkeley Glare Test (Bailey & Bullimore, 1991).
This causes disability glare which gets worse with increasing age due to light scatter within the older eye.
Disability glare -- light that is relatively bright compared to the background, making vision measurably worse.
visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, disability glare, or pure-tone audiometry and speech perception).
There was no significant relationship between levels of discomfort or disability glare and age or total number of flying hours.

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