disable

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disable

[dis′ā·bəl]
(computer science)
To prevent some action from being carried out.
To turn off a computer system or a piece of equipment.

disable

To turn off; deactivate. See disabled.
References in periodicals archive ?
See Harlan Lane, The Mask of Benevolence: Disabling the Deaf Community (New York, 1992) for criticism of the audiologist treatment model and the effect of cochlear implants.
When she sought other employment, the manager found that her disabling problems exempted her from comparable jobs that required physical demands no longer within her capacity.
On the basis of the appearance of a person with a disability, and perhaps on the basis of some personal or stereotyped information known to an employer about a disabling condition, employers sometimes make attributions about the competence, stamina, capabilities, limitations, and public image of a person with a disability that can have a significant impact on that person's career development.
Marshak and Seligman (1993) stress the relevance of counselors exploring the meaning individuals attach to their disabling conditions, regardless of whether it is newly acquired or more enduring.
Consequently, counselors need to be cognizant of the impact individual and societal views have on the identification of disabling conditions.
The Preparedness of Dental Professionals to Treat Persons with Disabling Conditions in Longterm Care Facility and Community Settings.
That is, parents are taught how to identify their child's disabling conditions, and to provide for his/her independent living.
Secondary prevention is early detection and treatment of a potentially disabling condition before permanent disability occurs.
The treatment of a disabling condition in a child often involves the contributions of a multidisciplinary team of specialists.
The incidence of disabling depression among elderly persons range from five to forty-four percent (Blazer & Williams, 1980).
The main goals of the Service are to provide state-of-the-art geriatric care and rehabilitation for common and complex disabling conditions and to serve as a training and research site for the field of geriatrics and rehabilitation.
The SSDI program is a program of public employment -- disability insurance created by Congress to insure workers contributing to the Social Security Trust Fund against the risk of future unemployment caused by the occurrence of a physically or mentally disabling condition.