discomfort glare

discomfort glare

[dis′kəm·fərt ‚gler]
(communications)

discomfort glare

Glare that is distracting or uncomfortable, interfering with the perception of visual information required to satisfy biological needs, it does not significantly reduce the ability to see information needed for activities. See also: Glare

discomfort glare

A low-level glare that causes discomfort and annoyance, but does not necessarily impair vision or visual performance.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There are two types of glare: discomfort glare (annoying or painful sensation) and disability glare (impaired or reduced visibility).
General visual discomfort criteria have been investigated in several previous studies, including daylight discomfort glare in perimeter offices with various fenestration attachments and variations in luminance patterns within the field of view.
New and different criteria--such as brightness, circadian stimulation, discomfort glare, dynamic properties, movement and color saturation--are often much more useful in telling us how well the lighting achieves our goals in a certain context.
Its low reflection design helps to reduce discomfort glare.
Discomfort glare reduces the contrast of visibility of the object being viewed, while intense glare can lead to temporary vision impairment.
Discomfort glare is a visual annoyance caused by luminance in the field-of-view that is considerably greater than the luminance to which the visual system is adapted [IES 2011].
In the case of excessively high luminance contrast or glass (mirror) surfaces in industrial buildings or working with computers, disability or discomfort glare may develop.
While it has been shown that the observer's gaze location (e.g., either fixed or free) does not significantly impact perceptions of discomfort glare in the context of oncoming headlamps (Bullough et al., 2003), the impact of different viewing locations, especially upon the entrance of a curve while driving, on target detection is not well understood.
Lighting engineers make a distinction between discomfort glare, which may not necessarily affect visual performance, and disability glare, which does.
Discomfort glare is assumed to cause discomfort without necessarily impairing the vision of objects.