discount

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discount,

in banking and investment, fee for lending money, which the banker deducts from the loan when it is given. Thus, with a $1,000 loan at a 6% discount, the borrower receives $940 and repays $1,000. Unlike a discount, interestinterest,
charge for the use of credit or money, usually figured as a percentage of the principal and computed annually. Simple interest is computed annually on the principal.
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 is paid periodically. Central banks, as in the U.S. Federal Reserve SystemFederal Reserve System,
central banking system of the United States. Established in 1913, it began to operate in Nov., 1914. Its setup, although somewhat altered since its establishment, particularly by the Banking Act of 1935, has remained substantially the same.
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, charge a discount when lending notes to member banks. Such a fee is often called a rediscount. When bills of exchange are cashed in advance, a percentage is discounted from the price they would bring at maturity. When securities are sold at less than par, they are said to be sold at a discount. Trade discount is a deduction from the list price. Discounts from transportation rates are called rebates. Certain banks specializing in banks' and bankers' acceptances, U.S. Treasury certificates of indebtedness, U.S. bonds approaching maturity, U.S. Treasury bills, and other high-quality, short-term credit obligations call themselves discount corporations.

discount

[′dis‚kau̇nt]
(industrial engineering)
A reduction from the gross amount, price, or value.

discount

1. at a discount
a. below the regular price
b. (of share values) below par
c. held in low regard; not sought after or valued
2. offering or selling at reduced prices
References in periodicals archive ?
The questionnaire included measures of the importance of store attributes in choosing a discounter (22 attributes), respondent lifestyle measures (40 items), store use patterns, and demographics.
Dales is a 7-8,000 line discounter. Chief executive Archie Norman claims that its prices are "10 per cent below Sainsbury"s[10].
The shift follows supermarkets turning to permanent price cuts to take on the might of discounters such as Aldi and Lidl, where almost half of households now shop.
"The discounters have been increasingly attracting upper middle class shoppers, who certainly weren't using them even two years ago," said Him!
It said the drop in cost was a direct result of the battle between the discounters and the traditional supermarkets, pulling prices down for all consumers.
Joanne Denney-Finch, IGD chief executive, said: "Half of shoppers told us they used food discounters in the last month to buy some of their food and groceries, up from 37% in 2011."
Many discounters depend on in-and-out promotions of deal items, but the trend has been to regular purchases, with some chains devoting as many as three gondolas to food in their bigger stores.
Euromonitor International's latest research shows that discounters sales are expected to register growth of 51 percent over the period from 2007 to 2012 in eastern Europe, following an 18 percent increase in 2007, and this will be a hotly contested battleground between Aldi and Lidl.
Fresh is a growing focus for Lidl and Aldi, as Morrisons CEO Dalton Philips acknowledged last week when he unveiled the retailer's latest plan to combat the discounters.
A survey which followed the opening of the first Aldi Local found 42% of shoppers would travel further than their local store to reach one of the discounters.
Despite the strategic logic of targeting growing demand from bargain-seeking consumers in the segment where Aldi and Lidl post double-digit sales growth, it remains to be seen if the new discounter chain will be a success.
Discounters also had 10.2% of prescriptions by unit, with supermarkets accounting for 13.9%, compared to drug chains' 53.6%.