discourse ethics


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discourse ethics

the conception that ethical agreements can be reached through ‘communicative argumentation’ aimed at a mutual, uncoerced understanding. See HABERMAS.
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A third defense against the charge that communicative action is individualistic, and therefore culturally biased, is found in Habermas's discourse ethics. Habermas has referred to his discourse ethics as representing a universal moral standpoint, a standpoint based in discursive reciprocity regarding expectations that others will justify the validity of their statements if challenged.
Habermas (1990) eventually developed discourse ethics as an explicit ethical theory incorporating the principles of his theory of communicative action.
Chapter 3, 'Affect Attunements', suggests that animals perform a kind of discourse ethics across species in their attunements to each other, in ways similar to those observed in human infants, and connects these macro-attunements with ways our bodies are synchronised with the microscopic symbionts living within us and all over our skins.
(33) Karl-Otto Apel, "The Ecological Crisis as a Problem for Discourse Ethics," in Ecology and Ethics, ed.
Davis, Felmon John, 'Discourse Ethics and Ethical Realism: A Realist Realignment of Discourse Ethics' (1994) 2(2) European Journal of Philosophy 125
The author has organized the bulk of his text in eleven chapters focused on rights theory, utilitarianism, Kantian theory, social contract theory, virtue theory, ethical relativism, discourse ethics, feminine ethics, environmental ethics, and the responsibilities of business executives.
Finally, the tradition of natural law, or more precisely, methodological commitment to an intrinsic, objective morality, is mediated in novel, postmodern keys--for example, the discourse ethics of Jurgen Habermas and Seyla Benhabib, and the capability theories of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum.
His discourse ethics our moral rule and choices, through thus we can achieve the partial justification; especially those arguments which are not convincing to all as well as not conclusively defeated but still we regard them as reasonable.
She begins by criticizing me for using the word "discourse" without giving an account of a variety of approaches to discourse analysis "ranging from Foucault's theory on discourse" to "Habermas's discourse ethics" (237).
Discourse ethics are no longer a novel reinterpretation of philosophical ethical theory, but a paradigm to be revisited, revised, and rejected.
For example, Utilitarianism with its concern for states of affairs is overly "eventistic" and attempts to adopt the "view from nowhere"; and discourse ethics abandons the first-order perspective of agents considering their own goods to ask how an intersubjective consensus could be attained among agents who pursue different goods.
Discourse ethics is a concept coined by German sociologist and philosopher Jurgen Habermas, for whom mutual understanding is the product of debate and discussion.