disk spring

disk spring

[′disk ‚spriŋ]
(mechanical engineering)
A mechanical spring that consists of a disk or washer supported by one force (distributed by a suitable chuck or holder) at the periphery and by an opposing force on the center or hub of the disk.
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[m.sup.1] Drive gear 1 (detail level 2 and 3) [m.sup.3] First half mass of disk spring (only for detail level 2) [m.sup.4] Second half mass of disk spring (only for detail level 2) [m.sup.2] Mass sum of piston, engaging pin, engagement bearing and L-sleeve (detail level 2 and 3) TABLE 4 Usual starting times depending on the engine starter system (cf.
where c = D/d and d = 102 mm is set according to the disk spring design manual [41].
The disk spring offers the potential of significant weight savings when designed with continuous fiber reinforced composite materials.
According to JETRO, Tokaibane are the number one manufacturer of the iMC spring--or disk spring as they are more commonly known.
The demands of the car industry for lightweight construction has led to the development of high strength spring and fastener elements by disk spring manufacturers.
Braking force is generated via an alternate-layer disk spring assembly.
In a series calibrated TCU the instant cylinder pressure after the prefill phase is equal to the pressure of the compressed return spring before the clutch disk spring begins to act [2].
The hydraulic cylinders are single action type, the rod being extended by the disk springs sets mounted behind the pistons (ON).
Heavy-duty disk springs are used to produce a high pull force on the clamp arms.