dislocation line

dislocation line

[‚dis·lō′kā·shən ‚līn]
(crystallography)
A curve running along the center of a dislocation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The comparison of structural changes for exposed targets reveals the change in grain size, dislocation line density and micro-strain on the target surfaces.
The consequent changes in dislocation line density and strain are shown in figure 2(c-d).
mu]] tangent to the dislocation line in the spacetime continuum [14, see pp.
We consider a stationary screw dislocation in the spacetime continuum, with cylindrical polar coordinates (r; [theta]; z), with the dislocation line along the z-axis (see Fig.
If we consider a stationary screw dislocation in the spacetime continuum, with cylindrical polar coordinates (r, [theta], z), with the dislocation line along the z-axis (see Fig.
1, it can be easily observed that there is an inverse relation between dislocation line density and sintering temperature [17].
Away from the dislocation line, the quasicrystal is perfect, as it would be with dislocations in periodic crystals.
He found the explanation by analyzing how silicons electronic structure changes when a dislocation line moves, he reports in the Sept.
Finally, unless the scattering vector is nearly perpendicular to a dislocation line, no appreciable scattering is seen.
A cross-section of the crystal, normal to the dislocation lines, can be subdivided into sub-areas of equal size and shape containing exactly the same number of dislocations.
Heat a sheet of metal or silicon enough to soften its brittleness, bend it ever so slightly, and tiny kinks, or dislocation lines, could form on the curved surface, looking somewhat like a series of speed bumps.