disorder

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disorder

[dis′ȯrd·ər]
(crystallography)
Departures from regularity in the occupation of lattice sites in a crystal containing more than one element.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A priest who stands alone before his congregation and declares that he is not disordered, and therefore should not be stigmatized with that damaging appellation, can seem to be most courageous.
Russell and Ryder assert that eating disorder symptomatology should not be addressed in school programs because of the high risk of teaching dangerous eating disordered behavior to impressionable youth.
Symptoms of this disorder can include fatigue, disordered sleep, headaches, dizziness, irritability or aggression, anxiety, depression, affective lability and apathy.
A child's violent streak may be misguided and morally repugnant without reflecting a broken brain or disordered mind, they hold.
Other chapters in this section cover followup studies on the Dangerous Behavior Rating Scheme (DBRS), present preliminary data on the MacAuthur Foundation Research Network on Mental Health and Law, discuss patterns of criminality in schizophrenics, compare rates of violence among mentally disordered and nondisordered inmates, and provide a comprehensive, but concise, review of psychopathy.
A group of scientists has discovered a defective gene in disordered mice referred to as Pax3 (lower case to distinguish it from the human symbol PAX 3).
Commonly perceived to be a female affliction, it is ironic that the first documented clinical case of anorexia was in a male; additionally, males comprise between 10% to 15% of the eating disordered population (Johnson & Connors, 1987; Keel, Klump, Leon, & Fulkerson, 1998; Russell & Keel, 2002; Walcott, Pratt, & Patel, 2003).
A second line of research in the MacArthur Foundation project concerns another little-studied area -- the role of coercion in getting mentally disordered people into psychiatric hospitals and the effect of patients' perceptions of coercion on treatment.
Due to the fact that school counselors often have daily contact with a large number of students, they can play an important role in the prevention and early detection of students who display the signs and symptoms of disordered eating.