disorientation


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Related to disorientation: dizziness, Spatial disorientation

disorientation

[dis‚ȯr·ē·ən′tā·shən]
(medicine)
Mental confusion as to one's normal relationship to his or her environment, especially time, place, and people; associated with organic brain disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the NTSB, "Although it is possible that the pilot may have experienced spatial disorientation, there was insufficient evidence to conclude that spatial disorientation contributed to the accident.
In this article, the variations of ultrasonic velocity occurring during the second and third stages are, respectively, used to explore the molecular orientation and disorientation.
Because that exhibition gave off a sense of hopelessness I thought Disorientation II could be an exhibition that highlights a more hopeful period in modern Arab history during the '60s and '70s," he said.
Joanna Murray, report author and senior lecturer in social research at King's College, said: "The combination of dementia and sight loss creates a profound sense of disorientation and provokes a great deal of distress, yet the role of sight loss in dementia is not being addressed.
Only by experiencing spatial disorientation can pilots be made aware of its effects and the challenges that arise when it happens, because it will.
On the second day of the institute, our task was to move from the disorientation of not knowing to the responsibility of finding out for ourselves.
The results showed a good improvement in disorientation, house soiling, sleep pattern and social interaction in treated dogs.
Swett argues that men responded to their disorientation and humiliation by withdrawing into a local culture of radicalism from which women were excluded: "It was through radical politics that many men sought to halt the dissolution of male authority in the home and neighborhood" (p.
of Maryland Baltimore County), about personal disorientation among the streets of history that may or may not have taken place.
The queuing, the disorientation, the anomie, the slog of physical distances, the lack of daylight and the endless shopping malls as a substitute for any kind of interior life.
The disorientation is heightened by druggily saturated, overheated color and fish-eye anamorphoses that bring close closer and push distance farther away.
On the second day of the Institute our task was to move from the disorientation of not knowing to the responsibility of finding out for ourselves.