dispersal barrier

dispersal barrier

[də′spər·səl ‚bar·ē·ər]
(ecology)
A physical structure that prevents organisms from crossing into new space.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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In other cases the negation is achieved without affecting the dispersal barrier but translocating the species instead.
Aquatic communities in aridland streams are often separated by harsh intervening terrain that can act as a dispersal barrier. However, genetic evidence suggests that populations of several obligatory aquatic taxa exhibit some genetic connectivity, indicating that at least a few individuals move between locations, however infrequently (Finn et al., 2007).
Later chapters cover topics such as alternative methods for snail control in aquaculture ponds, a heuristic tool for predicting dispersal of bighead carp in the Mississippi River system, an electric fish dispersal barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, and a theoretical strategy for eradication of Asian carp using a Trojan Y chromosome to shift the sex ratio of the population.
Also, the relatively high elevation of the Appalachians would have been an additional dispersal barrier to the low-elevation adapted mammals of Florida.
The nutrient-poor, acidic substrates in the extensive stretches of white sands on the eastern slope of the Andes in this region are an effective dispersal barrier for Nasa (which is restricted to more or less fertile soils), facilitating allopatric speciation.
The dispersal barrier in the tropical Pacific: implications for molluscan speciation and extinction.
Some recent studies suggest that agricultural fields surrounding a woodlot may not be as much of a dispersal barrier for rodents as once was thought (Wegner and Merriam, 1990; Cummings and Vessey, 1994).
In addition, strong color differences were detected suggesting that, despite the size of Australia as a target, 1000 km of open water has presented the anemonefish with a dispersal barrier that is rarely crossed.
The Fall Line is a major dispersal barrier to many reptiles and amphibians of the Coastal Plain.
Such transitions may act as dispersal barriers for Brush Mice to reach oak woodlands common elsewhere in southern Oregon.