dispersion force

dispersion force

[də′spər·zhən ‚fōrs]
(physical chemistry)
The force of attraction that exists between molecules that have no permanent dipole.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is due to the size of chlorine atom that is bigger than that of fluorine, thus exerting a significant impact on the London dispersion force and also the lipophilicity [17, 18].
The secondary force is again subdivided into Keesom force, Debye force, and London dispersion force, which is much larger than the other two Van der Waals forces.
This means that as trade costs fall further, so the clustering force becomes weaker, and location comes to be determined by factor prices, a dispersion force. This is the era of globalization, in which manufacturing starts to move from N to S and the equilibrium wage gap narrows.
Such types of component interactions comprise dispersion forces, induction and orientation effects, and hydrogen bonds [8].
Understanding the strength of agglomeration forces and of corresponding dispersion forces is central to a range of economic and policy questions.
They cover normal mode quantum electrodynamics: the quantum vacuum and its consequences, Van der Waals and Casimir-Polder dispersion forces, the Casimir stress in real materials, macroscopic quantum electrodynamics and vacuum forces, measuring Casimir phenomena, and Casimir forces at the cutting edge.
Korter's new research combines THz experiments with new computational models that accurately account for the effects of the London dispersion forces to predict crystal structures of various substances.
Among the basic principles of logistics, the following: logistics have made permanent, the establishment and maintenance of reserve materials (inventories), the supply is to be made a priority of sources of territory; logistics arrangement formations on the main effort ; dispersion forces logistics structures in the sport, each echelon responsible for the execution of transport for the own forces, each structure are liable to ensure their logistical support, logistical resources are used efficiently and economy (P.
where [W.sub.a.sup.d] represents the work of adhesion due to the dispersion forces and [W.sub.a.sup.h] is the work of adhesion due to the hydrogen bonds.
Nonbonding interactions are involved in these interactions, especially electrostatic, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals dispersion forces. Water is a good polar solvent.
He gives a qualitative description of types of interactions at large, intermediate, and short-range distances, including temperature dependence of the dispersion forces; and describes calculations, nonadditivity, and approximately 50 model potentials for processing experimental data and for computer simulation.
Dispersive component refers to London dispersion forces, and specific interactions refer to the polar, ionic, electrical, metallic, and acid-base interactions.