displacement rate

displacement rate

[dis′plās·mənt ‚rāt]
(petroleum engineering)
In oil well cementing, the speed at which a given volume of cement slurry or mud is pumped down the borehole.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Samples were loaded at a constant displacement rate of 25 mm/min, with an extensometer attached to record strain in the specimen gage length.
When a specimen is pulled at a constant displacement rate, the load first increases, attains a maximum, and then drops off precipitously to a lower value, at which point a neck is formed.
For example, data from the 1992 Worker Displacement Survey reveal that the job displacement rate during the 5 years preceding the January 1992 interview was considerably higher for Hispanic workers (11.8 percent) than for either black (8.8 percent) or white (7.9 percent) workers.(1)
The overall displacement rate followed the same trend, increasing to 7.9 percent for the most recent survey from 6.4 percent in the prior survey.
The correlation coefficient varies depending on epicentral azimuth and displacement rate. In the Visso earthquake, for the closest three stations (ACCU, AMAT, GUMA) there is a strong correlation in the east and up direction, whereas in the north direction, only a strong correlation for the GUMA station is visible.
[32] proposed a method to modify the contact stiffness data for creep and thermal drift based on the measurement of the displacement rate at the end of the holding period.
The specimens were statically loaded using an MTS 250 machine with a displacement rate of 2 mm/min up to failure.
The displacement rate increased as military operations were launched to retake the cities occupied by the militant group.
In one case, loaded at displacement rate c1 as a constant, the deformation rate of the specimen is given by
Then the normal displacement rate gradually decreases, approaching to a certain value eventually.
(1) The tests to determine appropriate shear displacement rate was successfully applied before unsaturated direct shear tests.
Their topics include evaluating kinematic displacement rate effects of transient thermal processes in thrust belts using coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element models, the Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the western Blue Ridge in the southern Appalachians: a critical examination of long-standing conflicts in a poly-deformed system, the Paleoproterozoic to Triassic crustal evolution of Korea's Gyeonggi Massif and tectonic correlation with the North China craton, thrust loading as a mechanism for crustal recycling: an example from the Swakane Gneiss Cascades crystalline core in Washington State, and geologic and kinematic insights from far-traveled horses in the Brevard fault zone of the southern Appalachians.