disposable


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disposable

[də′spō·zə·bəl]
(engineering)
Within a manufacturing system, designed to be discarded after use and replaced by an identical item, such as a filter element.
References in periodicals archive ?
Disposable baby diaper evolution started into the globalization period where economic boundaries, company acquisitions and merging and market share battles changed the way to do and operate business.
In the East of England region, East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust bought 11,139,673 disposable cups between 2013 and 2017.
In 1996/97, the richest fifth of households had an average disposable income of PS48,939.
Interestingly, disposable income Since 1996/7, cent of households their annual increase.
Latest gross disposable household income (GDHI) figures show that disposable incomes per head in Wales grew by 3.3 per cent between 2014 and 2015.
The breakthrough for disposable cup manufacturers in tackling such stringent hurdles is the advent of biodegradable materials in production of disposable cups.
One type of disposable systems is a Wave bioreactor (GE Healthcare), a customized system that uses rocking rather than a stirring motion to provide the agitation needed to suspend the cells and ensure good mixing.
However, MRG found that limitations could arise due to quality and reliability misperceptions associated with reprocessed disposable devices and the convenience of using new disposable devices.
Wales, Scotland and the North of England have experienced the greatest growth in disposable wealth, according to the research by database marketing specialists KDB.
US demand for disposable medical supplies will increase 5.6 percent annually to $71 billion in 2009.
As executive director, however, she doesn't want her nurses or CNAs concerned with how many disposable briefs or other products they put in service.
EPA recently issued a proposed rule to modify its hazardous waste management regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for certain solvent-contaminated materials, such as reusable shop towels, rags, disposable wipes and paper towels.