disquisition

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disquisition

a formal written or oral examination of a subject
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
After I had observed every flower, and listened to a disquisition on every plant, I was permitted to depart; but first, with great pomp, he plucked a polyanthus and presented it to me, as one conferring a prodigious favour.
But he checked all such wayward fancies, and held himself rigidly down to his disquisition.
The general pause which succeeded his short disquisition on the state of the nation was put an end to by Catherine, who, in rather a solemn tone of voice, uttered these words, "I have heard that something very shocking indeed will soon come out in London."
Mohegan heard this disquisition quite patiently, and, when Richard concluded, he held out the basket which contained his specifics, indicating, by a gesture, that he might hold it.
She got the name; but she got also a disquisition upon the proper method of making roads.
And he favoured us all with a long and minute disquisition upon the evils and dangers attendant upon damp feet, delivered with the most imperturbable gravity, amid the jeers and laughter of Mr.
The rest of the novel is an exercise in Rabelaisian humor, alternating between learned disquisitions and outlandishly disgusting sexual and/ or scatological encounters.
The head of the FATF delivered a detailed but well-written and coherent statement-a rare thing with long disquisitions.
"Verily, based on our foregoing disquisitions, the prosecution in this case failed to meet the required quantum of evidence to ascribe criminal liability on the part of accused Virata," the decision read.
The first part of the workshop will feature introductory disquisitions on economic history and on the contents of the Bank of Cyprus Historical Archive.
In a piece for the New York Observerwhich he ownstitled "The Donald Trump I Know," Kushner began by declaring, "My father-in-law is not an anti-Semite." Displaying the sort of defensive rationalization employed by people who feel a need to preface their disquisitions on inner-city crime or immigration with the proviso, "I'm not a racist," Kushner's article radiated the desperation of a hostage tapewhich, in a way, it was.
Through these disquisitions a sense of identity is realized and refined.