dissipation constant

dissipation constant

[‚dis·ə′pā·shən ‚kän·stənt]
(geophysics)
In atmospheric electricity, a measure of the rate at which a given electrically charged object loses its charge to the surrounding air.
References in periodicals archive ?
Offered in five temperature ranges, their dissipation constant is 2 mW/[degrees]C in still air or 13 mW/[degrees]C in stirred oil, with a typical thermal time constant of 0.75 second in stirred oil.
Typical dissipation constants of 0.3 mW/[degrees]C at 25/[degrees]C are available across the MCD range.
Interchangeable tolerances are available in [+ or -]0.10[degrees]C, 0.20[degrees]C, [+ or -]0.50[degrees]C, and [+ or -]1.00[degrees]C with dissipation constants of 2.5 mW/[degrees]C in still air and 13 mW/[degrees]C in stirred oil.