dissipation loss

dissipation loss

[‚dis·ə′pā·shən ‚lȯs]
(electricity)
A measure of the power loss of a transducer in transmitting signals, expressed as the ratio of its input power to its output power.
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For a wide range of applications, it is still possible to provide adequate ventilation and fan capacity to handle excess heat generated despite growing power density per processor and dissipation loss per unit volume.
The dissipation loss in the dielectric can affect the overall system noise temperature and, therefore, degrade the system gain vs.
The equivalent dissipation loss in the dielectric at normal incidence also can be extracted directly from the propagation constant of the dielectric using
The dissipation loss usually is a less significant factor compared to the reflection loss for a low loss dielectric with a relatively thin wall (below 0.080 mil).
Figure 11 shows typical dissipation losses at normal incidence for a thin-wall radome with a dielectric constant below 10.
The input and output filter capacitance is usually determined by the required number of capacitors sufficient to handle the dissipation losses due to the ripple current.
Good electrical properties: dielectric constant is 2.4 and the new materials exhibit minimal dissipation losses, making them suitable for data/communication and other low-to medium-voltage wire and cable applications.
The high frequency resistivity of the buried silver metallization is difficult to determine, as are the leakage and dissipation losses in the via walls.
According to researchers at Phillips, larger pipe diameters can compensate for dissipation losses by sending more light through the tube.