distance vector protocol


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distance vector protocol

A simple routing protocol that uses distance or hop count as its primary metric for determining the best forwarding path. RIP, IGRP and EIGRP are examples. A distance vector protocol routinely sends its neighboring routers copies of its routing tables to keep them up-to-date. Distance vector protocols date back to the ARPAnet network in the early 1970s. Contrast with link state protocol and path vector protocol. See routing protocol.
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References in periodicals archive ?
DVMRP being a distance vector routing protocol had the same shortcomings as those faced by unicast distance vector protocols such as Routing Information Protocol (RIP), where the hop count limited the protocols to be used only in smaller networks.
The Secure Efficient Ad hoc Distance vector protocol SEAD (by Hu, Johnson and Perrig [7]).
Among the three types of routing protocols, the simplest to configure is the distance vector protocol which use the distance and direction to find the best path to the destination by using an algorithm called the Bellman-Ford algorithm [13].
Destination sequenced distance vector protocol (DSDV) is selected as an example for table-driven protocols, while both dynamic source routing (DSR) and ad hoc on-demand distance vector (AODV) protocols are selected as examples for on-demand protocols [19-21].
Traditional protocols similar link state and distance vector protocols are improved to create on demand routing algorithm.

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