distant signal


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distant signal

[¦dis·tənt ′sig·nəl]
(civil engineering)
A signal placed at a distance from a block of track to give advance warning when the block is closed.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He explained, "When the distant signal license was enacted into law 30 years ago, its purpose was to allow fledgling satellite companies the ability to compete with cable companies and to compensate for technological limitations that made carrying local broadcast stations impossible in certain parts of the country.
network-affiliated broadcasters feared this "distant signal
" I tried to apply the break 1,400 metres before Bachhrawan railway station, where distant signal was located.
The error in the measured field from the distant signal paths compared with the nearest path is computed using the following equation:
So do the other distant signal feeds relayed by Shaw, whether it be Canadian specialty channels, movies, or American channels such as CNN and A&E.
But have come gradually to know that wanting is a distant signal, a far light or soul-point in the polite plains.
In a case involving the proposed microwave delivery of a distant television signal into Riverton, Wyoming, the Commission ruled that it could, and should, block the proposed importation of the distant signal on the basis that competition from the distant signal would harm the interest of the only broadcast station in the local market.(8) Using its perceived need to protect local broadcast stations, the FCC gradually expanded its jurisdiction over cable television: first, in 1965, over those systems that imported broadcast channels by microwave;(9) then, in 1966, over all cable systems.(10) This process culminated in the Supreme Court's holding in United States v.
When the distant signal was on, a vacuum valve opened in the shoe, which sounded a siren.
Before 1980, the FCC also restricted cable systems in the number of distant signals they could carry (the distant signal carriage rules) and required them to black-out programming on a distant signal where the local broadcaster had purchased the exclusive rights to that same programming (the syndicated exclusivity or syndex rules).(99) In 1980, however, the FCC took a decidedly deregulatory stance toward the cable industry in the interests of expanding program diversity, and it eliminated the distant signal carriage rules and the syndex rules.(100) Cable systems could now import as many distant signals as they desired.
This followedthe late March action by Maine's two Senatorsto formally express their concern about the reauthorization of STELAR, and its distant signal provisions.
This followed the late March action by Maine's two Senators to formally express their concern about the reauthorization of STELAR, and its distant signal provisions.