distillate fuel


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Related to distillate fuel: Bunker fuel, Bunker oil

distillate fuel

[′dis·tə‚lāt ‚fyül]
(materials)
Any one of the wide variety of fuels obtained from fractions boiling above the temperature at which gasoline comes off in the distillation of petroleum.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
2009-2011: To remove the biodiesel portion from distillate fuel oil, data for biodiesel consumption (calculated using data from EIA, EIA-22M, "Monthly Biodiesel Production Survey") and biomass-based diesel fuel data (from EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report," EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report," and EIA-815, "Monthly Bulk Terminal and Blender Report") are converted to trillion Btu by multiplying by the biodiesel heat content factor in MER Table A1, and then subtracted from the distillate fuel oil consumption values.
An earlier EIA report The Northeast Heating Fuel Market: Assessment and Options that addressed the ability of Northeast natural gas customers to switch to distillate fuel oil was released in May 2000.
(c) by upgrading available residual fuel oil from local refineries through secondary conversion into distillate fuels.
Since the beginning of the oil boom, US refineries have increasingly turned to exports to dispose of excess production of distillate fuel oil.
Reported gas service interruptions for northeastern customers using distillate fuel as backup were the equivalent of about 78 thousand to 84 thousand barrels of distillate per day during the peak week.
Distillate fuel oil supplied during January 2001 averaged 4.1 million barrels per day, 4 percent lower than the previous month's rate but 9 percent higher than the January 2000 rate.
Distillate Fuel Used by Electric Utilities, All Time Periods--For 1973-1979, consumption of distillate fuel is assumed to be the amount of petroleum (minus small amounts of kerosene and kerosene-type jet fuel deliveries) consumed in gas turbine and internal combustion plants.
Motor gasoline accounted for 44 percent of the total; distillate fuel oil, 18 percent; and kerosene-type jet fuel, 8 percent.
Motor gasoline accounted for 46 percent of the total; distillate fuel oil, 18 percent; and kerosene-type jet fuel, 8 percent.
A light distillate fuel oil that has a distillation temperature of 550 degrees Fahrenheit at the 90-percent recovery point and meets the specifications defined in ASTM Specification D 975.