distributed computing

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Related to distributed data processing: centralized data processing

distributed computing

[di‚strib·yəd·əd kəm′pyüd·iŋ]
(computer science)
The use of multiple network-connected computers for solving a problem or for information processing.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

distributed computing

(1) The use of multiple computers networked throughout a geographical area. The Internet is the world's largest distributed computing platform. See also grid computing.

(2) The use of multiple computers in an enterprise rather than one centralized system. This use of the term was coined in the late 1970s when minicomputers were installed in departments throughout a company instead of deploying terminals to a mainframe. Contrast with centralized processing.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Develops Distributed Data Processing Technology that Dramatically Reduces Disk Accesses
Data communications--or as those in the business call it, "distributed data processing"--are critical to many businesses, large and small.
New operating concepts such as distributed data processing, local area networks, X.25 public data networks and satellite transmission have promoted the use of data communications and increased the demand for less-expensive and more-reliable facilities and equipment.
Among larger companies, however, with broad DP requirements, mainframes or minis are necessary, and are most often already installed complete with distributed data processing power to serve multi-terminal stations.
The integrated office should revolve around multifunctional workstations using distributed data processing principles.
While Wisconsin's distributed data processing approach reduces telephone costs by eliminating the need for all processing to be done in an interactive mode with a central host system, it simultaneously enhances system reliability for offices scattered across the state's 56,000 square miles, because agencies can be productive even if communications are severed--a not-uncommon occurrence in Wisconsin, with its harsh winters and approximately 150 separate telephone companies.

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