ditching


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ditching

[′dich·iŋ]
(aerospace engineering)
A forced landing on water, or the process of making such a landing.
(engineering)
The digging of ditches, as around storage tanks or process areas to hold liquids in the event of a spill or along the sides of a roadway for drainage.

ditching

An emergency landing of aircraft in water.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those of us who frequently fly along the coast of Southern California can easily become complacent about the possibility of ditching, but we are not alone.
In coastal communities, the FAA often sponsors good courses on ditching and water survival that are full of valuable information, but the average pilot may never get any exposure to this knowledge unless he or she seeks it out.
Once the airplane soils the bed, the urge to get to land is strong and the fear of ditching often even stronger, thanks to years of misinformation and hangar-flying talk of how likely one is to die as a result.
Following our acquisition of the Fen Ditching Company, we hope to be clearing the ditches and lakes of the Sandringham Estate on an annual basis.
Mark Lewis, of Wright Hassall, said the company had acted for Blue Boar in buying the entire share capital of the Fen Ditching Company.
As well as expanding Fen Ditching's existing contracts, Blue Boar also wants to continue their former rival's ditch and lake clearing services to the Queen on her San-dringham estate in Norfolk.
The Fen Ditching Company has contracts for local drainage boards in East
Ditching an aircraft is something you hopefully will never face.
But, even if you restrict your flying to territory you think is dry land, a sufficient number of rivers and lakes exist in North America to make the possibility of ditching your aircraft a real one.
Drainage has been improved for producing grass, with extensive ditching of fields and wetlands to convey storm water runoff towards Lake Okeechobee (Haan 1995).