diuretic


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diuretic

(dī'yərĕt`ĭk), drug used to increase urine formation and output. Diuretics are prescribed for the treatment of edemaedema
, abnormal accumulation of fluid in the body tissues or in the body cavities causing swelling or distention of the affected parts. Edema of the ankles and lower legs (in ambulatory patients) is characteristic of congestive heart failure, but it can accompany other
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 (the accumulation of excess fluids in the tissues of the body), which is often the result of underlying disease of the kidneys, liver, lungs, or heart (e.g., congestive heart failurecongestive heart failure,
inability of the heart to expel sufficient blood to keep pace with the metabolic demands of the body. In the healthy individual the heart can tolerate large increases of workload for a considerable length of time.
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). They are also used to treat hypertensionhypertension
or high blood pressure,
elevated blood pressure resulting from an increase in the amount of blood pumped by the heart or from increased resistance to the flow of blood through the small arterial blood vessels (arterioles).
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 (high blood pressure) and glaucomaglaucoma
, ocular disorder characterized by pressure within the eyeball caused by an excessive amount of aqueous humor (the fluid substance filling the eyeball). This causes pressure against the optic nerve and compression of the blood vessels of the eye—the resulting
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. They act on the kidneys, modifying the absorption and excretion of water and electrolytes such as sodium and potassium. Types of diuretics include thiazides, loop diuretics, and potassium-sparing diuretics.

diuretic

[‚dī·yu̇′red·ik]
(pharmacology)
Any agent that increases the volume and flow of urine.

diuretic

a drug or agent that increases the flow of urine
References in periodicals archive ?
Alcohol acts as a diuretic because it suppresses the secretion of ADH from the posterior pituitary gland.
The rationale for considering an alternative loop diuretic in this patient hinges on bioavailability, which is "highly variable" for oral furosemide, at 10%-100%, while by contrast, torsemide and bumetanide have a very consistent bioavailability of 80%-100%, according to Dr.
In a study in Pakistan, it was found that 34% of the physicians prescribe ACE-I, another 34% use Beta Blockers, 17% use Diuretics, and 11% use Calcium channel blockers to manage Stage-1 hypertension.4 Osteoporosis is also a very common and a serious condition that lead to decrease in the bone mineral density thus increasing the risk of having fractures.
The co-administration of this narrowed therapeutic window drug with NSAIDs and diuretics is common, but seldom mentioned.
Conclusion: ACEIs and [beta]-blockers were barely employed to treat elderly CHF patients complicated with renal insufficiency, but diuretics and spironolactone were frequently utilized.
Unfortunately, loop diuretics are accepted as 'urine producers' among physicians in ICUs and are often used.
* Thiazide diuretics, such as chlorothiazide (Diuril) and hydrochlorothiazide (Microzide)
serrulatus leaves and its n-butanol fraction have significant (P<0.01) diuretic activity.
Ultrasonography was used to identify the presence of hydronephrosis, after which patients were referred for diuretic renal scans.
To assess therapeutic effectiveness of thiazide diuretic therapy, nurses should monitor patients' intake and output as well as blood pressure (Adams et al., 2014).
Dr Ho s research will examine why a diuretic used to increase urinary output in patients with AKI is effective in some patients but not others, and will potentially give clinicians the tools to identify these patients early and employ alternative means of managing their fluid levels.