diverse vector

diverse vector

[də′vərs ′vek·tər]
(navigation)
In air operations, an instruction issued by a radar controller to fly a specific course which is not a part of the predetermined radar pattern. Also known as random vector.
References in periodicals archive ?
The FAA on November 19, 2018, issued new operating guidance to pilots and operators of Part 25-certificated turbine-powered airplanes intended to help determine compliance with climb gradient requirements published in standard instrument departures (SIDs), obstacle departure procedures (ODPs), diverse vector areas (DVAs) and missed approach procedures.
This update happens to focus on Obstacle Departure Procedures and Diverse Vector Areas.
Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport is nontowered and has a Diverse Vector Area (DVA) from 350-180 degrees.
An ODP will be described in text and found in the "Takeoff Minimums, (Obstacle) Departure Procedures, And Diverse Vector Area (Radar Vectors)" portion of your flight planning documents.
Except for a Diverse Vector Area (DVA), ATC does not have responsibility for obstacle clearance below the MVA/MIA.
The FAA recognized the gap between controller's priorities and pilot expectations when creating diverse vector areas.
The Diverse Vector Area (DVA) occurs at airports with high traffic density where terrain and obstacles allow flexibility in departure routings.
Over the past several years, the FAA has also been introducing Diverse Vector Areas.
Diverse Vector Areas (DVAs) have been established at some larger airports for a safe and standardized way to guarantee obstacle clearance for aircraft departing on radar vectors.
All of that being said, if the departure occurs in an area of good radar coverage, the departure area can be provided with a Diverse Vector Area (DVA), where radar can play a bigger role.
Before blindly turning, simply ask whether you are at or above a minimum vectoring altitude (MVA) and will remain so during your climb or that he or she is using a diverse vector area (DVA) (see below).
This can be accomplished either by delivery of the end product (e.g., protein) or by gene transfer, using diverse vectors.