Lobby

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lobby

1. a room or corridor used as an entrance hall, vestibule, etc.
2. Chiefly Brit a hall in a legislative building used for meetings between the legislators and members of the public
3. Chiefly Brit one of two corridors in a legislative building in which members vote
4. a group of persons who attempt to influence legislators on behalf of a particular interest

Lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, hotel, or other structure.

Lobby

 

auxiliary premises in parliamentary and other government buildings, as well as in theaters and concert halls, designed for rest during breaks between sessions or during intermissions. Lobbies are also used for unofficial meetings and exchange of opinions and often serve as work areas for journalists. The expression “lobbying” characterizes behind-the-scenes deals made in capitalist legislative institutions by representatives of the ruling circles who are close to members of the institutions or to high government officials.


Lobby

 

the system of offices and agencies of the major monopolies assigned to legislative bodies of the USA. Lobbies exert direct pressure on legislators and state officials even to the point of bribery for the sake of the companies involved.

lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the Tories were agin it they should have had the courage to articulate that disgust by entering the division lobby.
But to act as if they are in the division lobby following a three- line whip in a united attempt to oust Wilson is a blatant abuse of their Westminster powers.
He can't even find the right division lobby (voters of Finchley please note).
Labour MPs dutifully trooped into the division lobby at Westminster to scupper a bid to suspend closures - just because it was a Tory idea.
The second is the one who on Wednesday quietly slipped through the division lobby in the House of Commons voting to end the right of prison officers to strike.
Armed police were brought in yesterday to guard the Commons chamber after protesters gained access through the 'No' division lobby which runs down the side of the floor of the House.
Secondly, what I take issue with is the insinuation that somehow the subject of this motion, which incidentally drew the support of 192 members in division lobby, was of little importance.
Edwina had chosen that moment to retell our distant history as if I had pushed her up against the wall of the division lobby only the week before.
MPs would then vote, in the division lobby, between the two candidates who come top of this poll.

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