doe

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doe

the female of the deer, hare, rabbit, and certain other animals

DOE

U.S. Department of Energy.

doe

[]
(vertebrate zoology)
The adult female deer, antelope, goat, rabbit, or any other mammal of which the male is referred to as buck.

DOE

Abbr. for the US Department of the Environment.

DOE

Distributed Object Environment: a distributed object-oriented application framework from SunSoft.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, Westinghouse and Rockwell appear to have authorized, and the DOE appears to have approved, a full-bore, all-out, spare-no-expense litigation.
DOEpack is DOS-based DOE software that performs both classic and Taguchi designs.
Today, I add more silliness by starting with the following introduction: "Up, down, tickle, tickle, 1-2-34-5-67-8..." and then, "Doe Doe Dee Dee..." The accompanying motions are as follows: Raise hands up high; bring hands down low; place both hands under the armpits and tickle yourself.
In 1954 Youden[15] reported on the use of DOE to optimize the testing of the abrasion loss of rubbers.
So, does it feel good to be able to be reckless with your body and your health now that you're all fixed?
While described by the DOE as medium- and low-level waste - including such seemingly harmless items as rags, rubber gloves and shoe covers - anything contaminated by plutonium can be extremely dangerous.
This is an efficient method for asset entry: The user does not have to look up the class life and proper depreciation percentage for the current period.
Regardless of political bent, we should be able to agree that unless we know more about what government does and how well it does it, we can't figure out how to fix it.
As good as the product is, it does contain some minor drawbacks.
A recent report by the General Accounting Office (GAO) stated that the DOE's Albuquerque field office employed this novel oversight technique: They allowed contractors to make their own determinations on whether they had a conflict-of-interest on a given project.
In late 1990, Congress established a revolving fund to finance DOE's isotope production and distribution program, seeding it with a one-time infusion of $16 million.
The software contains only an inventory card, which does not track quantities on hand.