do

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do

(programming)

do

(networking)
The country code for Dominican Republic.

Do

 

a mountain near the city of Thanh Hoa (Democratic Republic of Vietnam), on whose slopes the archaeologists Nguyen Dong Chi, Hoang Hung, and Le Van Lan discovered in 1960 the first ancient paleolithic site in Vietnam. In the course of investigations conducted from 1960 to 1968, more than 1,500 archaic Clactonian flakes were collected, as well as ten crude chopping tools (“choppers”), about 40 core tools, and several typical Chellean hand axes. The tools were made from local basalt. The Do materials closely resemble the materials found at Chellean sites in India, the Caucasus, Western Europe, and other regions.

REFERENCE

Boriskovskii, P. I. Pervobytnoe proshloe V’etnama. Moscow-Leningrad, 1966.

DO.

On drawings, abbr. for “ditto.”
References in periodicals archive ?
I think that until we implant in our minds that doing one's job or duty is a most ordinary thing, albeit an obligation, we will not grow and develop.
He said: "I felt I ought to do a eulogy as Paul Gambaccini, one of John's radio colleagues, is doing one."
Scientific progress begins when someone says four magic words: "I may be wrong." The scientific method is essentially an exercise in making educated guesses, then doing one's best to prove those guesses wrong.
Entering a room where Sandback has tensed his discreet--but all the more effective--ropes, one has to mentally construct the volumes these ropes demarcate, and in so doing one is immediately plunged into a fluctuating universe whose coordinates are constantly shifting.
In the summer of 2001, I had the privilege of doing one for two former employees of Americans United.
Venture partners who were doing nine or 10 deals a year in the late 1990s are now doing one or two.
You do 400 poses a day it s not necessarily better than doing one. You have to do it with quality and mindfulness.
Neil Keller's checkering fixture is a unique tool you will see in small and large gunshops that aids the gunsmith in doing one of the most difficult jobs, checkering.
"I didn't want to be known for doing one particular thing," explains Chew.
It beats doing one's own research, but it brings in some screwy and not-so-great ideas.
"We did one at $85, and now we're doing one at $101 - the highest in the city by far.
Take a turn doing one of the jobs that employees dread.