domain wall


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domain wall

A two-dimensional defect in spacetime that, unlike cosmic strings, cannot survive the inflationary era. See inflationary Universe.

domain wall

[dō′mān ‚wȯl]
(solid-state physics)
References in periodicals archive ?
The magnetization reversal process reveals typical ferromagnetic domain behavior--that is, domain nucleation and possibly domain wall propagation--in contrast to much weaker magnetic signals observed in the end-members, possibly due to super-paramagnetic behavior.
This is why magnetic nanodots and nanorings were shown to enable formation of a broad variety of magnetic states, such as onion or horseshoe, flux-closed vortex states, and domain wall states [8-15].
In this scenario spacetime is separated into two manifolds with their own distinct metrics, which are typically joined across a thin wall (domain wall).
To reach typical domain wall (DW) velocities of 10 x 100 [ms.sup.-1], a current density as large as ~[10.sup.11] to [10.sup.12]-A[m.sup.-2] would be necessary, resulting in huge Joule heating.
It is well known that existence of the intrinsic or artificial surface dielectric layer leads to qualitative change of the mechanisms of the domain structure evolution, appearance of the nanodomain ensembles, and lack of the domain wall shape stability [23, 24].
As a result, the permeability of the sample is increased by reducing the total area of domain walls and the amount of domain wall pinning.
In the course of their research into the use of magnetic domain walls (local regions of magnetic "charge" usually driven by magnetic fields) to increase our capacity for information storage and logical processing, physicists at the University of Nottingham have discovered a phenomenon which has allowed them to 'manipulate' the structure of a magnetic domain wall.
The authors of [4] mark out the following four causes of dielectric and electromechanical losses: (1) related to domain wall motion, (2) point crystal lattice defects, (3) microstructural losses at the grain boundaries because of material crystallinity, and (4) ohmic losses observed mainly in materials with high large electric conductivity.
One of the most famous partition functions in integrable lattice models are the domain wall boundary partition functions which was first introduced and analyzed in [7,8].
The characteristic features of transformations have been thoroughly studied, in particular, in the context of nucleation, growth, domain wall movement, merging, and elimination [32, 33].
However, the tan [[delta].sub.r], which is determined by the domain wall and spin rotational resonances, is predominant [17,18].

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