domestication


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domestication

[də‚mes·tə′kā·shən]
(biology)
The adaptation of an animal or plant through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with and advantageous to humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
The combination of different types of information in the domestication model of Lesquerella justify hybridization studies as part of a breeding strategy.
"The results lead us to surmise that people selected for domestication wolves with a particularly well-developed ability to collaborate, and then bred subsequent generations from these," noted Mia Persson.
Earlier research has suggested that dog domestication occurred in places as varied as Europe (SN: 12/14/13, p.
This haplogroup was regarded as a relatively ancient population expansion which has corresponded to the first domestication event of goats in nearly 10000 years ago (Luikart et al.
This allowed the researchers to test the domestication syndrome hypothesis on an evolutionary scale.
'We are about to take our break, but I can assure you all that, before we go, or immediately upon our return, we will put some time in making sure that the domestication convention bill is passed, that I want to assure this gathering', he promised.
In other words, Kistler explained, the final stages of maize's domestication happened more than once in more than one place.
We may have, as we have done over the past 30,000 years of animal and plant domestication, engaged in our own self-domestication, holding up certain physical and behavioral attributes as not only adaptive but, from the standpoint of aesthetics, attractive as well.
Miller (anthropology, Mississippi State University) examines the role of population packing, intergroup competition, and differential mobility in regard to the origins of domestication and agriculture in eastern North America.
Through the power of genomics, scientists at the University of Michigan compared the DNA of a dog and wolf to identify the genes involved in domestication.
Casey Brienza, Manga in America: Transnational Book Publishing and the Domestication of Japanese Comics, London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic, 2016, 232 pp., $29.95 (paperback).