dominant ideology thesis

dominant ideology thesis

(MARXISM) the thesis that working-class subordination in capitalist societies is largely the outcome of the cultural dominance achieved by the capitalist ruling class. A strong criticism of the thesis has been mounted by Abercrombie et al., The Dominant Ideology Thesis (1980), who argue that proponents of the thesis tend to overestimate the importance of cultural integration in modern societies, and to underestimate the extent to which subordinate groups are capable of generating beliefs and values which run counter to prevailing ideologies. In this, the dominant ideology thesis can be seen as an analogue of structural-functionalist theories, which are widely regarded as overemphasizing the importance of shared values. See also RULING CLASS OR DOMINANT CLASS, HEGEMONY, GRAMSCI, IDEOLOGY, IDEOLOGICAL STATE APPARATUS AND REPRESSIVE STATE APPARATUS, INCORPORATION, CONSENSUS, SOCIAL INTEGRATION AND SYSTEM INTEGRATION.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000